Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) can be a persistent struggle for patients taking opioids1,2

Opioids play an important role in pain management. However, their use is associated with risks and clinical considerations, including OIC.3

Every time I go to the bathroom…it’s like a battle.          —OIC patient†12 

Opioid-induced constipation is the most commonly reported side effect of opioids4

The incidence of OIC in patients with chronic pain varies and has been suggested to be as high as 81%*4

Opioid-Induced Constipation Prevalence
Opioid-Induced Constipation Prevalence

Opioid-induced constipation can begin with initiation and usually persists for the duration of opioid therapy2

Many patients continue to struggle with opioid-induced constipation despite current management options1

7 out of 10 patients with OIC reported little to no benefit from constipation treatments.
7 out of 10 patients with OIC reported little to no benefit from constipation treatments.

In the same study
49% of patients reported that OIC interfered moderately or completely with their pain control1

Your patients with an inadequate response to laxative(s) may be reluctant to discuss opioid-induced constipation1

Over 1/3 of patients with OIC did not discuss it with their HCP during their most recent office visit.
Over 1/3 of patients with OIC did not discuss it with their HCP during their most recent office visit.

You can help start the conversation
Keeping an open dialogue with these patients may help you effectively manage their needs13,14

Download the published results from a multinational burden of OIC study

*Published estimates of the incidence of OIC in patients receiving opioids for chronic pain vary due to differences in the studies conducted (eg, study design, definition of constipation, opioids used).15

Quotes are derived from interviews with frequent laxative users (patients who had used laxatives on at least 4 days over the 2 weeks prior to screening) conducted as part of a qualitative study designed to assess the content validity of a Stool Symptom Screener. A total of 66 adult patients with OIC (39 frequent laxative users and 27 non-frequent laxative users) from US clinical sites were enrolled. These quotes have been edited.12

Cross-sectional patient survey and chart review data from the baseline assessment of a longitudinal study in the United States, Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom. A total of 617 patients with OIC and chronic non-cancer pain were recruited. Of these, 500 patients (81%) completed the patient baseline questionnaire, and 493 (99%) met criteria confirming the presence of OIC (US, 242; Canada, 38; Germany, 115; UK, 98).1

§Constipation treatments included over-the-counter (OTC) laxatives, prescription laxatives, and behavioral/natural therapies, which included fiber supplements, increased fluids and exercise, and dietary changes. 29% of patients in the study reported “much benefit” from constipation treatments.1

ǁAmong patients in the study with sufficient laxative use, 94% had an inadequate response to at least 1 laxative agent within the past 2 weeks. Laxative inadequate response was defined as <3 bowel movements with ≥1 constipation symptom of at least moderate severity while taking at least one laxative agent ≥4 times in the past 2 weeks.1

Commonly reported reasons for not discussing constipation problems with their HCP included having discussed such problems with the HCP in the past (59%), being concerned that they would need to change/reduce pain medication (14%), and being embarrassed (9%).1

There is limited clinical experience with the use of MOVENTIG in OIC patients with cancer-related pain. Therefore, caution should be used when prescribing MOVENTIG to such patients. MOVENTIG is contraindicated in patients with underlying cancer who are at heightened risk of GI perforation, such as those with: underlying malignancies of gastrointestinal tract or peritoneum, recurrent or advanced ovarian cancer, or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor treatment.16

Read what patients have to say about OIC†12

Every time I go to the bathroom…it’s like a battle.

You don’t feel like yourself.

It worries me because…is this how my—how my life is going to be [?]

It’s a terrible thing to have to go through.

I remember that [straining and squeezing] every day of my life for the past 15 years.